Just a "zebra" trying my best to live life to the fullest with EDS and POTS...and loving the ride.

100!

Written by Katie. Posted in Giveaways

Happy 100th post to me! 

I’ve racked my brain to try and figure out what I could do to make this post special since 100 is a milestone…and I’ve gotten so much personal therapy and positive feedback out of this blogging journey.   

So I decided I would try a giveaway!   Now I know this experiment could be successful or it could flop, but I thought it was worth a try.

As I thought long and hard about what to give as a freeby, I knew I wanted to give something that might put a smile on another person’s face so I came up with this…

Ever since my Aunt sent me this blog, I have enjoyed reading the daily “awesome thing” post each morning to get my day started right.  It helps to remind me to appreciate the little things in life.  Well, there is also a book called The Book of Awesome by the same author of the blog that I would like to giveaway (along with maybe a BONUS surprise)…

So here’s the deal:

All you have to do is leave me a comment.  Just for fun, tell me who you are, where you live (if I don’t know you), and something that you would say is an awesome thing in your world. Or don’t. Just leave a comment about anything.
Leave your comment by Thursday, March 17th and on Friday the 18th I’ll pick a random winner to mail (for free) this fun book and surprise to. Please be sure I have an email address to get your mailing info in case you win. 

Even if I don’t know you, I would love for you to leave a comment.

Thanks for reading 100 times over!

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Comments (16)

  • Allie Dama

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    >1st one to commment…. I win.

    Reply

  • Allie Dama

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    >Crap, I forgot. "Glee" is an awesome thing because I have a large crush on Mr. Shu, Puck, and Blaine.

    Reply

  • Allie Dama

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    >Also, waking up in what you feel like is the morning, but realizing you have a couple more hours to sleep. AWESOME.

    Reply

  • Anonymous

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    >March Maddness is Awesome!

    Brad

    Reply

  • Anonymous

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    >I am going to win the book Allie!

    Monkey

    Reply

  • Meghan

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    >Repeats shouldn't count….Hubby and bunny 😉

    Love you guys!!!

    Reply

  • Meghan

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    >Plus, I'm gonna win…the 18th is my birthday!

    Reply

  • Kristen M.

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    >Things that are awesome: taking a half-day at work for no reason except that it's going to be 60 degrees and sunny and taking your kid to the playground.

    Kristen
    (Philadelphia)

    Reply

  • Madalena

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    >My nieces and nephews are AWESOME!

    Mada
    Cincinnati, OH

    Reply

  • Mary

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    >You are so awesome, Katie
    Love, An unbiased mother

    Reply

  • Anonymous

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    >Katie! You are such an inspration to me, I hope you know that!

    Reply

  • Katie

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    >Awww, THANKS so much! Did you want to leave your name for the drawing? Thanks again for your kind words.

    Reply

  • Sara Gooley

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    >Who won? What a cool thing – how many people don't you know following you?

    Reply

  • Katie

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    >Sara~My Aunt Mada won. I'm not sure..I average about 100-150 hits a day.

    Reply

  • Gabe

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    Warrior Ethos…Awesome…:

    I will always place the mission first.
    I will never accept defeat.
    I will never quit.
    I will never leave a fallen comrade.

    Reply

  • Gabe

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    And here’s an essay I wrote that explains why it is awesome…believe me it is related to you Katie 🙂

    “I will never leave a fallen comrade.” What does this sentence mean? I would like to share a story with you about my experience of escorting a Soldier home to his final resting place. You may or may not know, but a Soldier will be escorted by another all the way to his/her grave. This can be quite a humbling, if not life changing, experience. I have had that honor and I would like to share with you some bits and pieces of memories that I recall from that day:
    My escort duties took me on flights from Maryland to New York, by way of North Carolina. This indirect route was necessary in order to minimize travel time; it was chosen with the family members in mind. After briefly separating from the Soldier to maneuver the Maryland airport security, a corporate flight manager swiftly escorted me through the airport. She insisted I be with the Soldier as soon as possible. We were later joined by her supervisor, the regional flight director, on the tarmac while loading the casket onto the plane. As I finished my salute, I could see the many people at the boarding gate glued to the windows. I assure you that those people witnessing the honor given to that Soldier have spoken about that experience to their loved ones.
    As I boarded, a flight attendant burst into tears. “I have seen too many escorts on board my aircraft,” she said to me. She then hugged me and slipped away, wiping her tears.
    We transited in North Carolina. As I finished saluting the casket during its loading onto the New York-bound plane, I was glad to see the captain of the flight had joined me in my salute. I was also glad to see strangers on the flight deck had also stopped and given their respects.
    Upon our arrival in New York, the local police escorted the family members onto the tarmac so that they could see their beloved son deplane. One can only imagine the strings that were pulled in order for that to happen. More than five baggage handlers came to my aid to carry the casket onto the hearse. Despite the bitter cold and the absence of words exchanged, each one of them took off their gloves in order to leave the flag and casket untarnished.
    Delaying the funeral convoy is never an option, so I quickly got into the hearse to escort the Soldier to the funeral home. I made a half-hearted comment to one of the TSA agents to take care of my luggage, not expecting him to still be guarding it when I returned several hours later. As we exited the airport, a formation of firefighters rendered their salutes. I tried to imagine the conversation between the fire chief and whoever it was that told him about the convoy.
    “I will never leave a fallen comrade.” What does this sentence mean? How far does this sentence go? Think of all those people that were touched by that Soldier’s homecoming. Although they were all strangers to that Soldier, each of them will always remember how this country honored him. As one of my sergeants explained to me, the sentence “I will never leave a fallen comrade” is part of a promise. It is a promise from Soldier to Soldier, from the commander to the commanded, from the United States Government to all servicemen and women. It is a promise that we are never alone; a promise that despite your death, a battle-buddy will be with you until you reach your final resting place; and a promise that when you get there you will be honored by this country.

    So, I am unsure if that essay was appropriate for this venue. I can only say that when I read your blog request, this is the first thing that popped into my head…So, how does this relate? Well, you see Katie…WE…are your fellow Soldiers. Through your toughest times….We will be there. We will never leave you behind. SO TROOPS…I urge you all to live the warrior ethos day in and day out! Promise each other that each of us will never ever be alone!

    Reply

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